Kids burn 50% more energy playing virtual sports than computer games

thecheers.org    2008-07-14 09:41:26    

Sydney, July 14 : A British study has revealed that playing interactive sports video games like the Nintendo Wii help children burn over 50 per cent more energy than playing sedentary computer games like Xbox does.
A British study has revealed that playing interactive sports video games like the Nintendo Wii help children burn over 50 per cent more energy than playing sedentary computer games like Xbox does.

However, the study also reveals that the children use much less energy playing virtual sports than they would in the real versions.

Associate Professor David Dunstan, head of the physical activity lab at the Baker IDI Heart and Diabetes Institute, points out that real boxing burns more than twice as much energy as Wii boxing, and real tennis is 77 per cent more demanding than the electronic version.

Reported in the British Journal of Sports Medicine, the study suggests that a child who played Wii sports would use about two per cent more energy than the one who played sedentary computer games in a week.

The authors of the study said that the increase was "trivial", and that the activity was not intense enough to be counted in the recommended daily amount of physical activity.

They, however, agreed that such games were preferable to sedentary games.

Dunstan said that further research was needed to determine what role such games might play in metabolic health, since various studies have linked too much sitting with heightened risk of heart disease, stroke and diabetes, irrespective of how much moderate to vigorous exercise people did at other times of the day.

He said that interactive games could be useful in helping to increase people's level of activity throughout the day.

Nintendo Australia public relations manager Heather Murphy conceded that playing Wii was not a substitute for more vigorous activity.

"But it's a great way for people to ease into exercise or to complement what they're already doing," the Sydney Morning Herald quoted her as saying. (ANI)
© 2007 ANI


TAGS: Science   


more
Why the veggie burger tastes just as good as a non-veg one

While a scrumptious non-veggie burger may be treat for your taste buds, the taste for meat could be based in part on expectation rather than reality, says a new study led by an Indian researcher, which shows that personal values deceive taste buds.

Scientists to drill into a crack in the edge of the world

An international consortium of scientists is preparing to drill into a crack in the edge of the world - the South Island's Alpine Fault in New Zealand.

US warrant surrendering Dr. Death to Oz Police imminent
18.Jul 2008
Ending a three-year quest to bring controversial In...read

Icebergs scouring ocean seabed could have severe effects on marine creatures
18.Jul 2008
New data has suggested that due to an increase in ...read

Humming fish gives clues to the origins of vocalization
18.Jul 2008
A male midshipman - a close relative of the toadfi...read



"Assisted migration of species" necessary for saving wildlife from global warming

Antarctica and North America may once have been connected

Indian-origin researchers find way to create heat pumps, energy converters from 'nanosculpture'

NASA's Deep Impact films Earth as an alien world

Men and women really do have different brains