Australian scientists develop culture to destroy reef-killing starfish

By Jay Gory, thecheers.org    2012-10-11 13:23:36    

Following a study linking poisonous crown-of-thorns starfish to 42 percent of Australia's Great Barrier Reef destruction in recent decades, James Cook University Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies in Queensland has developed a culture to destroy the reef-killing starfish, announced yesterday. The researchers have carried out successful trials of the culture against the starfish.
Following a study linking poisonous crown-of-thorns starfish to 42 percent of Australia's Great Barrier Reef destruction in recent decades, James Cook University Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies in Queensland has developed a culture to destroy the reef-killing starfish, announced yesterday. The researchers have carried out successful trials of the culture against the starfish.

The culture is a beef extract similar to Bovril, the ABC (Australian Broadcasting Corporation) reported.

The culture is expected to replace a manual treatment of the problem, involving a poison injection delivered by a diver to each starfish. One of the researchers, Jairo Rivera Posada, stressed urgency and scale of the threat: "In the current outbreak in the Philippines they removed as many as 87,000 starfish from a single beach".

The researchers said the culture infects a starfish with bacteria that kill it within just 24 hours and spread by contact with other individuals of the species. This means divers would need to inject just one starfish to infect and destroy many individuals living close to each other.

The researchers recommended addressing the problems behind starfish outbreaks: "Any attempts to control these outbreaks will be futile without also addressing the root cause of outbreaks, including loss of starfish predators as well as increased nutrients that provide food for larval starfishes" referring to the agricultural run-off along the reef coast.

The researchers concluded the culture works and needs testing of its impact on other sea species.
Jay Gory, The Cheers News


TAGS: World-news   


more
Gambia confirms exit from Glasgow-hosted Commonwealth Games

Following Gambia's sudden withdrawal last week from the Commonwealth of Nations, the country confirmed today they have withdrawn from the Glasgow-hosted Commonwealth Games scheduled to take place next year. This leaves 70 countries and territories competing in the Games.

CFPB records fewer complaints in early days of US government shutdown

Unlike some parts of the US Federal Government, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) has been open during the federal government shutdown and recording a record-low number of complaints submitted by consumers against mortgage companies, credit card companies, student loan providers, banks, money transfer providers, companies who provide credit reports, and other companies providing consumer loans.

Walgreens helps developing countries with up to 3 million life saving vaccines
16.Sep 2013
The largest drugstore chain in the U.S. has made a commitment of providing up t...read

Miss America Pageant Crowns First Indian-American Winner
16.Sep 2013
Nina Davuluri of New York state has won the 2014 Miss America pageant in Atlant...read

Haunted attractions in Texas prepare for 2013 Halloween season
16.Sep 2013
With Halloween approaching, numerous haunted attractions all over Texas are pre...read



WikiLeaks Trial of US Soldier to Begin

Scores Killed in China Slaughterhouse Fire

Highly preserved mammoth presents scientists with blood sample Highly preserved mammoth presents sci

House Approves $982B Budget to Fund US Government

Venezuelan President Hugo Chávez dies aged 58