Turning on hormone tap may help fight osteoporosis

thecheers.org    2008-07-16 15:28:43    

Washington, July 16 : European pharmacologists say that a potential new drug that 'opens the taps' for the release of useful hormones may trigger the growth of new bones, and eventually bring relief to osteoporosis sufferers.
European pharmacologists say that a potential new drug that 'opens the taps' for the release of useful hormones may trigger the growth of new bones, and eventually bring relief to osteoporosis sufferers.

The researchers made a presentation on the exciting potential of the so-called negative allosteric modulators at a special symposium at The Federation of European Pharmacological Societies (EPHAR) 2008 Congress at The University of Manchester, UK, on Wednesday.

They said that their work focussed on the stimulation of parathyroids-tiny glands located above the thyroids that control the release of the parathyroid (PTH) hormone into the bloodstream.

When the concentration of calcium is too low in the blood's plasma, PTH is released and acts on various tissues to increase the level of calcium in the blood. This calcium then activates the calcium sensing receptor on the parathyroid cell, which then reduces PTH release.

The first POSITIVE allosteric modulator was recently introduced into clinical practice for treating patients displaying high levels of PTH in the plasma - such as those with chronic kidney disease on dialysis and those displaying hypercalcaemia with parathyroid cancer. It mimics the effect of calcium on the receptor and so reduces PTH release.

The researchers said that negative allosteric modulators had been found to block the effect of calcium on the parathyroid cell in pre-clinical trials, and thereby increase the release of PTH in the serum.

"Daily administration of a negative allosteric modulator of the calcium sensing receptor should promote a sustained increase of PTH in such a way that it will stimulate new bone formation," said symposium organiser Martial Ruat, a neuropharmacologist at the government funded Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique in France.

"Now clinical trials will have to demonstrate the effectiveness and suitability of negative allosteric modulators for treating osteoporosis in humans," the researcher added.

Dr. Raut also said that it might take at least another eight to 10 years before negative allosteric modulators were passed for use in patients.

"Osteoporosis is a complex disease and the timescale might be rather long," said Dr. Ruat, who is himself carrying out research to learn more about the potential benefits of both negative and positive allosteric modulators.

"The calcium sensing receptor is also found in the kidney, the intestine, in some vascular and bone cells and also in the brain. We still need to identify the roles of this receptor in these tissues before being able to specify novel applications of these drugs," he added.

European pharmacologists are studying negative and positive allosteric modulators to identify the functions of calcium sensing receptors in the control of blood pressure also. (ANI)
© 2007 ANI


TAGS: Health   


more
Join The "Imagine. Create. Inspire." Conference

Get the unique insight from public relations and communications professionals from around the world. PRSA 2011 International Conference will be taking place October 15 in Orlando, USA.

Alcoholism – growing trend or lame fiction?

Alcoholism is one the addictions that is causing the most problems in today’s world. Car crashes, disturbed families, unnecessary and unpredictable violence – in very many cases too much alcohol is to blame here. Alcoholism Treatment is talked about a lot, yet most of the people going into various different treatment programs go there not because of their own will, but because they are sent there with a court order.

New Report highlights inadequacies in NHS hygiene standards
22.Jul 2008
Hospitals and Primary Care Trusts (PCT) in England have been revealed to be fai...read

Our bodies use ancient defence mechanism to fight retrovirus
22.Jul 2008
A new study has found evidence that our ancestors ...read

Yet another way HIV fools the immune system uncovered
22.Jul 2008
Scientists at the Partners AIDS Research Center at...read



Arthritis wonder drugs may hold key for many more diseases

Too much sleep ups ischemic risk in postmenopausal women

RComm-MTN tie-up under threat after RIL starts arbitration proceedings

Fall prevention programs cut elderly falls by 11 pct

CT scans offer cheaper diagnosis of low-risk chest pain